The New Mexican Restaurants Cuisine In Dallas

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The New mexican restaurants cuisine in Dallas, mexican food restaurants in dallas, mexican food catering dallas, reative chefs and restaurateurs are inspired by Mexico.

Mexican restaurants in Dallas – A taco moo shu duck confit with hoisin sauce and seasoned with napa cabbage into strips and pea pods (snow pea pods). Ribeye steak grilled with potato gratin and poblano chile, cactus salad and chili hollandaise Morita. Lobster fajitas.

Throughout Dallas, creative chefs and restaurateurs are inspired by Mexico.

Red snapper with peach, purslane, and chile de arbol seeds LTO Kitchen
Red snapper with peach, purslane, and chile de arbol seeds LTO Kitchen

Mexican Restaurants in Dallas

You can see in Kitchen LTO, the “permanent temporary restaurant” Trinity Groves, where Anastacia Quiñones just taken command of the kitchen, which starts a six-month project.

In that place you can start dinner with fried pumpkin flowers stuffed with Oaxaca cheese corn salsa in a tomato vinaigrette, or quesadillas, style pie stuffed with huitlacoche and truffle slices on a guacamole.

There are also original ceviches, eg shrimp, pineapple and chopped and soaked in coconut milk with a touch of chile jicama, plus an aroma hoja santa and a little lemon.

New Mexican Restaurants Cuisine In Dallas
New Mexican Restaurants Cuisine In Dallas

And what about the stuffed crab enchiladas covered with a sumptuous mashed corn and poblano chile with cheese and purslane salad and crispy chicken thighs in black mole.

The carnitas, succulent and golden brown, served with lentils come in achiote and grilled pineapple salad.

The style is similar to what he did in Alma Quiñones, where he rose to fame as an executive chef in 2011.

The first half of this year has been slow and, frankly, quite dull when it comes to new restaurants.

The opening points of hamburgers and hot dogs, bars where food is sold and second or third branches of existing restaurants have far exceeded the original restaurants in the past six months.

However, there has been a remarkable creative energy around the Mexican flavors that captivate Quinones and other chefs from Dallas.

That is being reflected in the dishes of El Bolero, Sugar Skull Cafe, C’Viche Taco Tequila Bar and Cantina Le Campestre and in Chula Vista in Fort Worth, all of which opened in the last four months.

However, one of the “new wave” Mexican restaurants is opening this summer: Godmother, where the chef Kyle McClelland (Proof + Pantry) will be creating modern Mexican dishes with a French accent.

Three tacos Sugar Skull Cafe, Chicharrón, El Pescador and Carne Asada.
Three tacos Sugar Skull Cafe, Chicharrón, El Pescador and Carne Asada.

Unusual versions of Mexican cuisine, whether modern or traditional, are not new to North Texas. The traditional and regional Mexican cuisine has always been an alternative to the Americanized dishes covered with cheese that came to be known as Tex-Mex.

Meanwhile, the arrival of modern Mexican cuisine to Dallas goes back almost 20 years. La Valentina de Mexico, a branch of the famous restaurant in Mexico City in Far North Dallas, opened in 1996. The restaurant critic then of The Dallas Morning News described the context Waltrina Stovall:

“In Dallas there are many places where to find Tex-Mex and authentic Mexican,” he wrote, “but the menu Valentina, whether one calls ‘Mexican cuisine’ or ‘Aztec nouvelle’ is different.”

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